AB 782.12

Miss Kyoto

  • AB 782.28 Tea Ceremony Booklet
  • AB 782 u.1-5
  • AB 782 s Sensu
  • AB 782 o Higasa
  • AB 782.9 Miniature Chest
  • AB 782.25 Doll Purse
  • AB 782.18 Teapot
  • AB 782.13 Hair Ornament
  • AB 782.11 Zori
  • AB 782.8 Chest
  • AB 782.17 Tea Caddy
  • AB 782.6 and AB 782.7 Bonbori Lamps
  • AB 782.24 Otedama
  • AB 782.14 Tea Set & AB 782.15 Bamboo Container
  • AB 782.12 Miss Kyoto's Geta
  • AB 782.10 Mirror and Case
  • AB 782.5 Trunk
  • AB 782.19 Hibachi Set
  • AB 782.23 Toy Lamb
  • AB 782.1 Miss Kyoto (front)
What is it?
What is it made of?
Where is it from?
When was it made?
Object ID
AB 782.12

This pair of geta are Miss Kyoto accessories. This distinctive style of geta is known as okobo (or pokkuri or koppori) because of the sound they make when walking. They are intended for very formal wear by young girls and geisha-in-training (maiko). These geta are made of orange lacquer with a gold leaf and floral pattern. They have a woven straw sole and orange and gold silk toe thongs. The soles are made of a deep solid wood shaped at a slant towards the toe, with a hollow space carved into the wood with a bell and thong attachments.  There is a brass toe tap. 

Geta are a form of traditional Japanese footwear that resembles both clogs and flip-flops. They are a kind of sandal with an elevated wooden base held onto the foot with a fabric thong to keep the foot well above the ground. They are worn with traditional Japanese clothing such as kimono or yukata, and also with Western clothing during the summer. Sometimes geta are worn in rain or snow to keep the feet dry, due to their extra height compared to other footwear, such as zori (flat, thonged footwear).  

Donated by the Committee on World Friendship Among Children, 1928
AB 782.12 Miss Kyoto's Geta