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AB 76-67

Folk Toys and Games

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  • AB 76-67 Hanafuda cards
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  • AB 76-114 Temari Ball
What is it?
Hanafuda Game
What is it made of?
Paper/Plastic/Ink
Where is it from?
Kyoto, Japan
When was it made?
pre-1976
Object ID
AB 76-67
Description

This deck of cards, called Hanafuda cards, feature colored designs and are used in a matching/counting game. Each of the cards has a different brightly colored decoration, for example: a small orange deer under a tree with autumn leaves; a large white moon in a red sky over a dark hill; a purple flower with a waterwork in front and red cloud above; and a red and purple bird over a purple flower (all in the photograph). The top of the case has a folded blue card that includes the rules of the game and shows an image of a woman in a kimono identified as Princess Sen (1597-1666), the eldest daughter of the shōgun Tokugawa Hidetada (1579-1632) and a popular historical figure.

Hanafuda ("flower cards") are Japanese playing cards. They come in twelve suits, one for each month; each suit is assigned a flower and has four cards. Hanafuda cards can be used in a variety of games.

This object was donated to the Boston Children's Museum by the Citizens of Kyoto, Japan in 1976 to honor the BostonKyoto Sister City relationship and the move of The Japanese House to Boston.

 

Credit
Donated by the citizens of Kyoto, Japan, 1976
AB 76-67 Hanafuda cards