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AB 1007

Clothing

  • 2013.4.1 Kimono (back)
  • 2012.6.4 Kimono (back)
  • 2012.6.2 Kimono (back)
  • 2009.169.1 a-c Jinbei & Haramaki
  • AB 1007 Haori Coat (back)
  • AB 1002 s1 Wedding Kimono (back)
  • AB 76-53 Wedding Kimono (back)
  • 2012.3.5 Uniform (Jacket)
  • AB 76-133 Kimono (back)
  • AB 76-103 Hakama
  • 2012.3.3 Boy Scout Uniform (Shirt)
  • 2012.3.7 Uniform Pants
  • 2012.3.2 Uniform Skirt
  • AB 76-138 Tsuke Obi
  • AB 66-5 a Obi
  • AB 1 1002 c s3 Jacket
  • 2012.3.4 Jacket (front)
  • 2012.3.1 Jacket
  • 2012.4 Wedding Kimono
  • AB 76-132 Kimono (back)
What is it?
Haori Coat
What is it made of?
Cotton/Dye
Where is it from?
Japan
When was it made?
pre-1947
Object ID
AB 1007
Description

This haori (traditional coat) is intended to be worn over a kimono. The jacket is knee-length and reversible. The haori is black on one side with wisteria blossoms painted on both sides of the sleeves in yellow and orange; the leaves are green and maroon. The front features a similar design on the lower part in the same colors, with the addition of one blue bunch. The other side, the lining, is pale green with a 12-inch border at the bottom in black. The flowers depicted include pale roses; lavender chrysanthemums; orange, blue, and lavender daisies with green leaves; and orange wisteria. The Tokugawa family mon (crest), called the maruni mitsu aoi, is printed on the center of the back, on the sleeves, and on the front.

A haori is a short jacket that is typically worn over a kimono. Originally worn by men, haori became acceptable for both sexes to wear during the Meiji period (1868-1912). Haori are occasionally mistaken for happi coats; the two are similar in design but happi are usually made of cotton and are intended for festivals rather than as outerwear. 

A mon (also known as a kamon) is a Japanese family crest. Similar to coats of arms in the European tradition, a mon identifies a specific individual, family, or group/guild. Mon are usually found decorating clothing, armor, weapons, roof tiles, fans, passports, and even food labels.

 

Credit
Donated by Mrs. John Rettinger, 1947.
AB 1007 Haori Coat (back)